NPR : News

Filed Under:

Talk About Rough Politics: Korean Lawmaker Sets Off Tear Gas Canister

Angered by the ruling party's successful push to ratify a free trade deal with the U.S., a South Korean lawmaker "doused rivals with tear gas" earlier today during a raucous session of parliament, The Associated Press writes from Seoul.

Korea's Yonhap News agency reports that:

"Rep. Kim Sun-dong of the Democratic Labor Party (DLP) was in the full parliamentary session at around 4 p.m. when lawmakers of the ruling Grand National Party abruptly called a plenary session in an apparent move to ratify the bill. Kim threw the tear gas bomb near the Speaker's seat, where vice parliamentary speaker Chung Ui-hwa was sitting at the time."

Chaos, as they say, ensued until order could be restored.

As the AP reminds us:

"Such chaotic scenes are not uncommon in South Korea's parliament, where rival parties have a history of resorting to physical confrontation over highly charged issues. In 2008, opposition lawmakers used a sledgehammer to try and force their way into a barricaded committee room to stop the ruling party from introducing a debate on the U.S. trade deal."

The wire service has some "raw video" of the scene.

Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Hey, Kids, Remember You're On Our Side: The FBI Makes A Movie

Instead of a public service announcement, the FBI has made Game of Pawns, a docudrama about a college student recruited by the Chinese government. The message is obvious: Don't be a spy.
NPR

Soup to Nuts, Restaurants Smoke It All

While you won't find cigarettes in restaurants anymore, some smoking isn't banned. It's not just meat, either; it's hot to smoke just about anything edible.
WAMU 88.5

Virginia Remains At Odds With Feds On Medicaid Expansion

Lawmakers in Virginia continue to resist the $9.6 billion Medicaid expansion on offer from the federal government as part of the Affordable Care Act.

NPR

Watch For The Blind Lets You Feel Time Passing

A new watch allows the blind to feel time on their wrists. Designer Hyungsoo Kim tells NPR's Wade Goodwyn his watch allows users to tell time accurately without revealing their disabilities.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.