NPR : News

Filed Under:

Occupy America: The Commemorative Game

What began in the fall of 2011 as the amorphous Occupy Wall Street movement in New York City morphed into Occupy America, a nationwide diorama drama containing many elements of a board game — positive steps, punishing losses of turn and, in some cities such as Hartford, Conn., occasional free parking.

The movement against greed, war, waste, discrimination — and sundry other things — has had light moments, such as the election of Shelby the Dog as leader of Occupy Denver. And dark moments: reports of pepper spraying, sexual assaults, deaths and general chaos in or near some encampments.

What will the Occupy movement ultimately mean? No one is quite sure. Dot-orgs such as Move On and Occupy Wall Street hope to harness the fervor and fury of disillusioned Occupiers. Putting the chant in disenchantment — "We are the 99 percent!" — this was, after all, the not-so-silent majority.

Regardless of the outcome, the protests have often resembled Life. And Risk. And Candyland and other games. Anti-Monopoly in living color and 3-D, perhaps.

The Occupy movement has provided satisfactions, frustrations and successes. Just like a game.

Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

WAMU 88.5

Remains In Jamestown Linked To Early Colonial Leaders

Scientists from the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History and The Jamestown Rediscovery Foundation say they've identified four men buried in the earliest English church in America.
NPR

Me-Tea-Morphosis: Tea Bags Get Second Life As Works Of Art

Artists are reinventing the humble tea bag, letting its contents and simple shape and color shine in beautiful, fragile art. Some are even farming out the tea drinking to get to the used bags.
NPR

New York's LaGuardia Airport To Get Long Overdue Redesign

NPR's Melissa Block talks to Janet R. Daly Bednarek, an aviation expert and professor at the University of Dayton, about the airport that was once thought of as a model for all U.S. airports.
NPR

Researchers Warn Against 'Autonomous Weapons' Arms Race

Already, researcher Stuart Russell says, sentry robots in South Korea "can spot and track a human being for a distance of two miles – and can very accurately kill that person."

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.