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Occupy America: The Commemorative Game

What began in the fall of 2011 as the amorphous Occupy Wall Street movement in New York City morphed into Occupy America, a nationwide diorama drama containing many elements of a board game — positive steps, punishing losses of turn and, in some cities such as Hartford, Conn., occasional free parking.

The movement against greed, war, waste, discrimination — and sundry other things — has had light moments, such as the election of Shelby the Dog as leader of Occupy Denver. And dark moments: reports of pepper spraying, sexual assaults, deaths and general chaos in or near some encampments.

What will the Occupy movement ultimately mean? No one is quite sure. Dot-orgs such as Move On and Occupy Wall Street hope to harness the fervor and fury of disillusioned Occupiers. Putting the chant in disenchantment — "We are the 99 percent!" — this was, after all, the not-so-silent majority.

Regardless of the outcome, the protests have often resembled Life. And Risk. And Candyland and other games. Anti-Monopoly in living color and 3-D, perhaps.

The Occupy movement has provided satisfactions, frustrations and successes. Just like a game.

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