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Officials Offering To Open 3 New D.C. Middle Schools

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D.C. schools officials are offering to create three new middle schools that would enable students to participate in specialty programs.
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D.C. schools officials are offering to create three new middle schools that would enable students to participate in specialty programs.

D.C. schools officials are offering to create three new middle schools with different specialties in northeast Washington.

According to published reports, the plan was offered last week to parents who've complained about the lack of education options in Ward 5. It involves closing three pre-school through 8th grade campuses created in 2008 by former school Chancellor Michelle Rhee. Back then, the concept was said to be unpopular with many parents.

Those critics claimed enrollment in the combined elementary and middle schools wasn't high enough to generate enough funding for middle school programs.

The measure calls for opening a new stand-alone middle school for arts and world languages, a pre-school through 8th grade school with an International Baccalaureate program, and a science and technology middle school in part of McKinley Technology High School.

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