NPR : News

Through The Lens: Seeing Veterans Up Close

Suzanne Opton is the author of Soldier/Many Wars.

When the war in Iraq began, I worried there would be a draft. What if my son was called? How would he ever recover from going to war?

I decided that I wanted to meet the young men and women who voluntarily sign up. I began at Fort Drum in upstate New York where I photographed soldiers between tours of duty in Iraq and Afghanistan. There was little conversation as I asked each soldier to adopt a vulnerable, intimate position, and lay his or her head on a table. I did not give these images captions.

Later I went to the Veterans Affairs medical clinics in Vermont to photograph veterans who were in group therapy for post-traumatic stress disorder. I thought if I draped them in fabric, they could become a boy with a cape, a warrior, a martyr, a saint. Unlike the active-duty soldiers, these vets liked to talk. The more they did, the more I realized they could have been in any one of these roles.

Read An Essay From A Veteran About Returning From War

Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

In 'You're The Worst,' Even The Most Flawed Characters Find Love

Producer Stephen Falk and actress Aya Cash discuss their FXX series about two self-centered people who fall in love. The characters are "stand-ins for the dark parts of all of us," Falk says.
NPR

Our Robot Overlords Are Now Delivering Pizza, And Cooking It On The Go

A Silicon Valley start-up wants to use technology to solve the pizza paradox. It's a food that's meant to be delivered, but never tastes quite as good upon arrival.
WAMU 88.5

Rating The United States On Child Care

A majority of parents in the U.S. work outside the home. That means about 12 million children across the country require care. A new report ranks states on cost, quality and availability of child care - and says nobody is getting it right.

NPR

Our Robot Overlords Are Now Delivering Pizza, And Cooking It On The Go

A Silicon Valley start-up wants to use technology to solve the pizza paradox. It's a food that's meant to be delivered, but never tastes quite as good upon arrival.

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