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CQ Roll Call: Super Committee At 'Make Or Break' Point

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Another week is coming to a close, and still there is no deal in sight for the super committee charged with cutting more than $1.2 trillion from the federal deficit. There are just 12 days left before the super committee's deadline, joining us now with the latest from Capitol Hill is David Hawkings, with the CQ Roll Call Daily Briefing.

This had been called a 'make or break' week, where do things stand with negotiations?

"Well they didn't make it, so I guess that means they broke it," says Hawkings.

You can't really say Congress has broken it until the last possible second, however, so there's at least an outside chance that they will resolve things. The odds are getting longer by the day. It takes seven, maybe even eight votes, to get the solid bipartisan majority for whatever they come up with.

And then, whatever they come up with has to go to the "scorekeepers" -- the director of the Congressional Budget Office.

How much longer do they really have?

They really need to have whatever they are going to score by next weekend. The true deadline is the day before Thanksgiving

The CBO has already done some preliminary work -- they have already taken the opening bid offers from the Republicans and Democrats to see what those proposals would actually save. They've done some of the homework, but they really need to finish by next weekend

Congress passes part of jobs bill

"Yes, a tiny, tiny sliver of the President's jobs proposal will become law," says Hawkings.

It is, somewhat predictable given that today is Veteran's Day, the one thing that the two parties and the President could agree on to -- to accept the President's plan to create two very modest tax breaks for companies that hire disabled veterans and long-time unemployed veterans.

The Democrats and President Obama relented on their insistence that any tax breaks would have to be offset with tax hikes on millionaires. It would have been a tiny tax, but Democrats gave up on that, and it sailed right through.

Is this a sign of bipartisanship?

"It's a tiny one -- it shows that gridlock is not a total lock. It's only symbolic, and obviously done with today's holiday in mind. It will not create more than few thousand jobs, so there's no last impact," says Hawkings.

At the very least it shows that Republicans are willing to help create jobs if there are no taxes on millionaires, and it shows that Democrats are pushing bipartisan legislation. The prospects for the rest of the jobs bill is not as rosy, but there's still a chance that parts of it could be included in the proposal from the super committee.

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