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Wheelchairs Donated To Wounded Vets

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Knights of Columbus donate dozens of wheelchairs to the Washington D.C. Veterans Affairs Medical Center.
Patrick Madden
Knights of Columbus donate dozens of wheelchairs to the Washington D.C. Veterans Affairs Medical Center.

As the nation pauses to remember the sacrifices of those who have served in the military, one local charity is helping distribute wheelchairs to local veterans.

With the Fourth Degree Choir belting out patriotic tunes and the Honor Guard leading a “presentation of colors,” the central lobby of D.C.’s Veterans Affairs Medical Center was transformed for a special gift from the Knights of Columbus: the donation of dozens of brand new wheelchairs. 

“The Knights of Columbus hope this small effort on our part can make the care and recovery of those our country a little easier,” says Vernon Hawkins, state chairman for the program.

The Knights of Columbus are donating a total of 110 wheel chairs to three Veterans Affairs facilities in D.C. and Maryland. 


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