From Chompsgiving to Chew Year's: Holiday Dishes | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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From Chompsgiving to Chew Year's: Holiday Dishes

'Tis almost the season, and what would the holidays be without our favorite foods?

There are the traditional standbys — like turkey and cranberry sauce at Thanksgiving, or latkes for Hanukkah. But many people also have a special dish they eat only during the holidays. For example, one NPR reader raves about lefse, which she says is a potato-based staple for any traditional Norwegian-American holiday dinner. It's "best served hot with butter. Or cold with butter and sugar. Butter is key," she writes.

For this year's festivities — from Thanksgiving to New Year's — NPR will feature some of these dishes, on-air and online. Our reporters across the U.S. will be reporting on their personal favorites, but we also want to hear about yours. So please tell us in the form below about your unique holiday dishes — recipes that are significant to your family or region.

Note: Photos may be requested for the dishes NPR selects.

Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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