WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Driver Not Charged For Striking Three At Occupy D.C. Protest

The driver who was involved with striking three Occupy D.C. protesters in downtown D.C. Friday night will not be charged, reports the Associated Press. According to authorities, the driver wasn't cited because he had a green light when his vehicle struck the three pedestrians.

Witnesses told police that the three pedestrians 'either ran toward or jumped in front of the moving vehicle.'

"The protesters were apparently trying to block the roadway," said Lt. Christopher Micciche, with the D.C. police "It was essentially an accident where three individuals were injured but they were in violation by being in the roadway."

Micciche said one pedestrian jumped on the hood of the car, and another was cited for being in the roadway.

The male driver of the vehicle was traveling southbound on 7th Street NW at K Street NW when the accident occurred at about 10 p.m. The three pedestrians were transported to two local hospitals Saturday morning with non-life-threatening injuries, according to D.C. Fire Department spokesman Lon Walls.

Hundreds of protesters affiliated with Occupy D.C. shut down streets Friday near the convention center, where a conservative group was gathering.

NPR

Encore: 'Future Shock' 40 Years Later

Future Shock by Alvin Toffler was a huge sensation when it was published in 1970. The book perfectly captured the angst of that time and prepared society for more changes to come.
NPR

In Prison, The Passion That Drove A Yogurt-Maker To Arson Still Burns

The yogurt entrepreneur who set fire to his factory remains in prison, but he's in better spirits now. "He's dreaming again," says his wife.
WAMU 88.5

The Politics Hour - July 1, 2016

Kojo and Tom Sherwood chat with D.C. Transportation Director Leif Dormsjo and Virginia Del. Marcus Simon (D-Fairfax).

NPR

'Future Shock' Author Alvin Toffler Dies at 87

Toffler's warnings about 'information overload' and the accelerating pace of change in modern society made his seminal 1970 book a best-seller in the U.S. and around the world.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.