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Hundreds Of Hams Help Veterans in Need

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Winthrop Robbins (in the red hat) received a ham from Smithfield.
Markette Smith
Winthrop Robbins (in the red hat) received a ham from Smithfield.

Thousands of hungry veterans and their families will benefit from a donation of 30,000 pounds of Smithfield ham. The meat was delivered to the Southeast Veterans Service Center in the District Friday.

Winthrop Robbins, a Vietnam veteran who served in 1968 and 1969, is serving his community today by helping to unload a truck full of ham. He's standing in an assembly line of volunteers, as they take out individually wrapped packages of meat. The Capital Area Food Bank will then distribute it to veterans and military families in need.

But he's not only taking part in distributing the food. Robbins will be a recipient, as well. He says his monthly benefits check just isn't enough.

"We surely need it in our kitchen," he says, explaining that he only receives about $700 a month.

A portion of the ham will also go to homeless veterans in the District.

Smithfield is partnering with the United Food and Commercial Workers Union to coordinate the donation. Smithfield spokesman Dennis Pittman says the food goes fast.

"We bring in 30,000 pounds and the food banks tell us it'll be gone in two weeks," says Pittman.

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