WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

BRAC Employees Face Fines For Illegal Parking

Play associated audio
A parking enforcement officer writes a ticket for an illegally parked car near the Washington Headquarters Service, sometimes known as BRAC-133.
Michael Pope
A parking enforcement officer writes a ticket for an illegally parked car near the Washington Headquarters Service, sometimes known as BRAC-133.

Residents in the West End of Alexandria are worried about their neighborhood streets. Now that the Base Realignment and Closure process has brought the Department of Defense's Washington Headquarters Service to the Mark Center complex, many are petitioning the city government to create new daytime parking districts.

Parking enforcement officer Cheryl Fuller has been patrolling Alexandria's streets for 13 years. But this year is like no other, because the West End of the city has been invaded by DOD employees.

"I think there's a legitimate concern with the residents that BRAC is going to take over their streets," she says.

Patrolling the newly created parking district 12 near the Mark Center, Fuller is looking for specific streets where neighbors are complaining that employees of the Washington Headquarters Service are parking. She's looking for city decals or parking stickers proving that the vehicle is legally parked.

"So, you're looking here," she explains. "There's no District 12 permit, but they have a city decal. That one over there doesn't have a city decal, and they do not have a District 12 sticker. So they are going to get a ticket."

Fuller writes three $40 tickets in the first five minutes of her shift.

"Any time I write a BRAC ticket, I log it down and I write it on the back of my worksheet so that they can go back and see just how many BRAC tickets are being written," she says.

In the three months since the daytime parking district was created, more than 100 tickets have been written. Resident Dana Hisky says she's noticed a difference in the neighborhood.

"I have noticed that since these have been enforced, there's nobody here, which leads me to believe that the people that were here before were people that probably shouldn't have been here to begin with," says Hisky.

So far, fewer than half of the 6,400 employees have moved in to the building. It's expected to be at full capacity early next year.

NPR

'Kids Love To Be Scared': Louis Sachar On Balancing Fun And Fear

The award-winning author of Holes has just published a new novel for young readers, called Fuzzy Mud. It mixes middle-school social puzzles with a more sinister mystery: a rogue biotech threat.
NPR

Confronting A Shortage Of Eggs, Bakers Get Creative With Replacements

Eggs are becoming more expensive and scarce recently because so many chickens have died from avian flu. So bakers, in particular, are looking for cheaper ingredients that can work just as well.
NPR

Jon Stewart's Private White House Meetings

Comedian Jon Stewart was called to the White House on at least two occasions for private meetings with President Obama, according to Politico. NPR's Arun Rath speaks with reporter Darren Samuelsohn.
NPR

An App Tells Painful Stories Of Slaves At Monticello's Mulberry Row

A new app uses geolocation to bring to life a lesser-known section of Thomas Jefferson's Virginia estate — Mulberry Row, which was the bustling enclave of skilled slaves who worked at Monticello.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.