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Tourmobile Ends Service After 42 Years

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Tourmobile is making its final round after more than 42 years of service.
Ben Murray: http://www.flickr.com/photos/benmurray/4468445478/
Tourmobile is making its final round after more than 42 years of service.

After more than 42 years of guiding millions of visitors around the District's monuments and historic attractions, Tourmobile is ending its operations. The sightseeing tour bus will make its final run today. 

It’s estimated millions of visitors have taken one of Tourmobile’s guided tours around the monuments on the National Mall or at Arlington National Cemetery. Tourmobile started as a subsidiary of Universal Studios in 1969 with just three vehicles. Ownership changed hands in the 1980s, and the fleet later expanded to 39 buses.

Last August, the National Park Service, which subcontracts Tourmobile, announced it was unlikely the company's contract would be renewed. Park service spokesperson Bill Line, admits the company had been in "tough straits" financially in recent months.

Tourmobile rates are $32 a person. The company served around 800,000 people each year. It's not clear if another service will pick up the contract to host the guided tours.

The Park Service has begun the process to pick a successor to Tourmobile, according to Line. The buses will run until 6 p.m. tonight.

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