Coworkers, Neighbors Testify In Lululemon Trial | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Coworkers, Neighbors Testify In Lululemon Trial

Play associated audio
Eila Rab, coworker and friend of both Brittany Norwood and victim Jayna Murray. She testified Friday that she texted Murray's number to Norwoodthe night of the murder. Norwood told her she had forgotten something in the store and needed Murray to let her back in.
Jonathan Wilson
Eila Rab, coworker and friend of both Brittany Norwood and victim Jayna Murray. She testified Friday that she texted Murray's number to Norwoodthe night of the murder. Norwood told her she had forgotten something in the store and needed Murray to let her back in.

Testimony in Brittany Norwood's murder trial continues at Rockville District Court today. Norwood is charged with killing her coworker Jayna Murray inside a Lululemon yoga boutique in Bethesda in March. She first told police that she and Murray had been attacked by two masked men who broke into the store after hours.

Today the jury heard testimony from two managers at the Apple Store in Bethesda, next door to Lululemon. They each say they remember hearing two female voices arguing through the wall separating the two stores. One manager heard a voice say "talk to me, don't do this" followed by hysterical screaming, grunting, thudding and then the sound of something heavy being dragged.

Jurors also heard from coworkers who had contact with Brittany Norwood and Jayna Murray on the day of the murder. Eila Rab told the jury she counted both women as close friends, and had met Norwood for lunch, a manicure and pedicure earlier in the day. She also recounted texting Murray's cell phone number to Norwood shortly before the fatal confrontation between the two. She says Norwood told her she had forgotten something in the store and needed Murray to let her back in.

Friday was the second full day of testimony in the trial. On Thursday, the jury heard from the nurse and police officer who met Norwood when she was admitted to Suburban Hospital after being found tied up on March 12. They described the wounds they observed on Norwood, and noted several details, such as a cut on her thumb and a lack of blood in hair, which originally cast doubt on her story.

Detective Deana Mackie, who interviewed Norwood the day after the murder, also took the stand. Norwood told Mackie that she and Murray had been attacked by two men, and had tried to help Murray as they beat her to death, but couldn't. She then described how they tied her up and cut her with a knife, only to leave her there for hours.

The prosecution is trying to use the self-inflicted wounds and the elaborate cover-up as proof of a premeditated crime. They are pursuing a first-degree murder charge. The defense does not dispute that Norwood killed Murray, but argue that it happened during a horrific fight and was not premeditated.

The trial is expected to last into next week.

NPR

Many Views Of Muhammad, As A Man And As A Prophet

In her new book The Lives of Muhammad, Boston University professor Kecia Ali discusses the different ways that Muslim and non-Muslim biographers have depicted the prophet over the centuries.
NPR

Chef Ottolenghi Makes The Case For 'Plenty More' Vegetables

Israeli chef Yotam Ottolenghi talks with Rachel Martin about the difference between supermarket hummus and Middle Eastern hummus and why he doesn't like to call his cookbooks "vegetarian."
NPR

Will Ebola Impact Midterm Elections?

Weekend Edition Sunday's new segment, "For the Record," kicks off with politics and Ebola. NPR's Rachel Martin asks NPR's Mara Liasson and Dallas columnist J. Floyd about the politics of the disease.
NPR

Getting Medical Advice Is Often Just A Tap Away

NPR's Arun Rath speaks with infectious disease specialist and HealthTap member Dr. Jonathan Po about telemedicine and hypochondria in a time of heightened health concern.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.