U.N. Votes To Lift Libya No-Fly Zone On Oct. 31 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : News

Filed Under:

U.N. Votes To Lift Libya No-Fly Zone On Oct. 31

The U.N. Security Council voted unanimously Thursday to lift the no-fly zone over Libya on Oct. 31 and end its authorization of military action to protect civilians.

The council authorized the actions on March 17 in response to an Arab League request to try to halt Moammar Gadhafi's military, which was advancing against rebels and their civilian supporters. The NATO bombing campaign that followed was critical in helping the rebels oust Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi from power in August.

The council adopted the resolution a day after Libya's deputy U.N. Ambassador Ibrahim Dabbashi asked members to wait until the transitional government made an official request, which he hoped would come by Oct. 31.

But the U.N.'s most powerful body decided that there was no need for U.N.-authorized military action following the death of Gadhafi on Oct. 20 and the transitional government's announcement of the country's liberation on Oct. 23.

Last week, NATO announced preliminary plans to phase out its mission on Oct. 31. But the alliance unexpectedly postponed a decision on Wednesday, saying NATO Secretary-General Anders Fogh Rasmussen needed to continue consultations with the United Nations and Libya's National Transitional Council.

The resolution ends the U.N. authorization for military action just before midnight on Oct. 31, which means that Libya will regain control of its airspace and all military operations effective Nov. 1.

Russia's U.N. Ambassador Vitaly Churkin had called for an end to military operations on Oct. 31 and welcomed the council's action — as did the ambassadors of United States, Britain, France, Germany, South Africa and other council nations.

Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Chicago To Replace Famed Ferris Wheel With Taller One

NPR's Rachel Martin talks with Alexander Eisenschmidt, an assistant professor of architecture at University of Illinois at Chicago, about the new Chicago Ferris Wheel.
NPR

Why The World Might Be Running Out Of Cocoa Farmers

West African cocoa farmers earn less than $1 a day. Those low wages could jeopardize the future of chocolate labor, as young farmers find better opportunities to earn a living, a new report warns.
NPR

Donald Trump Controversy Highlights Influence Of Hispanics In U.S.

NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with Felix Sanchez, chairman and co-founder of the National Hispanic Foundation for the Arts, about Republican presidential candidate Trump's remarks on Mexican immigrants.
NPR

Pilot In Solar-Powered Plane Sets Aviation Record

André Borschberg, flying Solar Impulse 2, set a new record of 120 hours in the cockpit on a journey from Japan to Hawaii.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.