WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Funding Needed For PG County Domestic Violence Center

Play associated audio
Congresswoman Donna Edwards (D-Md.) took a tour of the Domestic Abuse Center on Tuesday, hoping to shine some light on its budget needs.
Armando Trull
Congresswoman Donna Edwards (D-Md.) took a tour of the Domestic Abuse Center on Tuesday, hoping to shine some light on its budget needs.

The Prince George's Hospital Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Center is about to mark its first year serving victims of domestic abuse. While the Center has done tremendous work helping people in the community, budget concerns in Maryland make its continued operation less than certain.

"We’ve had little boys, little girls, teenagers, young men, young women, older folks who’ve been sexually violated," says Cheryl Banks, who works in the Center. Banks says the facility began officially working with victims of domestic abuse only last year, she argues that they have been dealing with the issue for much longer, since both domestic and sexual abuse are often intertwined.

“We’ve done forensic exams for women who have been beaten and raped by their husbands, their boyfriends, for example, their estranged boyfriends," says Banks.

Karalyn Mulligan works directly with domestic abuse victims, and she says the center counsels them and even assesses their chances of further abuse by asking a series of questions: "Has he ever threatened to kill you before? Do you think he may kill you? Is he unemployed? There’s not a numbered score. You either score high at a high risk of being killed or you don’t”. 

The Center expects that the number of victims it serves is on the increase -- they served 300 victims last year. It's hoped more funding will be forthcoming. Congresswoman Donna Edwards toured the facility earlier this week and says if society doesn’t pay for centers like this, there are indirect costs "for medical treatment, for lost days at work, for all of the wide ranging economic and social impacts that sexual assault and domestic violence have on our communities."

A victim who asked not be identified agrees: "We need to do something about this problem or it's going to tear apart the fabric of our community."

NPR

Opulent And Apolitical: The Art Of The Met's Islamic Galleries

Navina Haidar, an Islamic art curator at the Met, says she isn't interested in ideology: "The only place where we allow ourselves any passion is in the artistic joy ... of something that's beautiful."
NPR

Tired Of The Seoul-Sucking Rat Race, Koreans Flock To Farming

More than 80 percent of people in South Korea live in cities. But in the past few years, there has been a shift. Tens of thousands of South Koreans are relocating to the countryside each year.
WAMU 88.5

Fannie Lou Hamer and the Fight for Voting Rights

Kojo explores the life and legacy of Fannie Lou Hamer, a poor Mississippi sharecropper who became an outspoken voice in the civil rights movement and the fight for voting rights.

WAMU 88.5

Computer Guys and Gal

Chrysler recalls cars to boost their cybersecurity. Microsoft debuts its new Windows 10 operating system. And navigation tech could bring us robotic lawn mowers. The Computer Guys and Gal explain.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.