NPR : News

Cities Aim To Control 'Occupy' Protests, But Oakland Clashes Loom Large

Scott Olsen, a 24-year-old veteran of the Iraq War, is hospitalized in Oakland with a skull fracture. Tuesday night he suffered, as the Oakland Tribune says, "the first serious injury nationwide in the Occupy Wall Street movement" when some type of projectile — possibly a tear gas canister fired by police — struck above his right eye.

Oakland authorities are investigating. As we reported Wednesday, there was violence in Oakland after authorities broke up the protesters' camp outside City Hall.

What happened to Olsen comes, Morning Edition and several other news outlets report today, as cities across the nation grapple with how to respond to the growing Occupy movement.

NPR's Margot Adler surveyed what mayors and police in different cities are trying, from sending in clergy to meet with protesters (Atlanta) to city officials marching with the protesters (Providence) to enforcing curfews (Chicago). She says mayors are sharing ideas.

The New York Times this morning says that "after weeks of cautiously accepting the teeming round-the-clock protests spawned by Occupy Wall Street, several cities have come to the end of their patience and others appear to be not far behind."

And the Los Angeles Times says that across the nation "officials are beginning to talk openly of moving protesters out of their encampments in parks and public squares." But, the newspaper adds, "looming large is the cautionary spectacle of Oakland."

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NPR

A Glimpse Of Listeners' #NPRpoetry — From The Punny To The Profound

It was a simple idea: Would you, our listeners, tweet us poems for National Poetry Month? Your response contained multitudes — haiku, lyrics, even one 8-year-old's ode to her dad's bald spot.
WAMU 88.5

Eating Insects: The Argument For Adding Bugs To Our Diet

Some say eating insects could save the planet, as we face the potential for global food and protein shortages. It's a common practice in many parts of the world, but what would it take to make bugs more appetizing to the masses here in the U.S.? Does it even make sense to try? A look at the arguments for and against the practice known as entomophagy, and the cultural and environmental issues involved.

WAMU 88.5

A Federal Official Shakes Up Metro's Board

After another smoke incident and ongoing single tracking delays for fixes, U.S. Secretary of Transportation Anthony Foxx announced a shake-up of Metro's board.

NPR

'The Guardian' Launches New Series Examining Online Abuse

A video was released this week where female sports journalists were read abusive online comments to their face. It's an issue that reaches far beyond that group, and The Guardian is taking it on in a series called "The Web We Want." NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with series editor Becky Gardiner and writer Nesrine Malik, who receives a lot of online abuse.

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