Virginia Man Arrested For Sex Trafficking Minors | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Virginia Man Arrested For Sex Trafficking Minors

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A man from Springfield, Virginia is in under arrest in connection with a sex-trafficking ring that authorities say is part of the MS13 gang.  The underground prostitution business recruited runaways and kept them virtually in bondage.

U.S. Attorney Neil McBride says 23-year-old Rances Ulices Amaya is the leader of a local MS-13 clique and that Amaya recruited clients for young prostitutes he describes as "females under the age of 18."  Court documents claim Amaya threatened; and physically and sexually assaulted the young women and also provided armed security during their sexual "appointments." He is accused of instructing at least one of the girls to lie about her age with clients.

"They are focused on recruiting vulneralbe young runaways and dragging them into this horrific world of juvenile prostitution. It's a modern form of slavery," says  McBride.

Amaya is charged with sex trafficking of a minor, and could face life in prison if convicted. The U.S. Attorney's office says this is the fifth case prosecuted this year that involves gang-related sex trafficking in Northern Virginia.

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