NPR : News

Filed Under:

Report: College Costs Continue Rising, Aid Cuts Could Add To Pain

Students and parents won't be surprised to hear that the prices colleges and universities officially charge for tuition, room and board went up yet again this academic year.

The College Board reported Tuesday that:

-- "Published in-state tuition and fees at public four-year institutions average $8,244 in 2011-12, $631 (8.3 percent) higher than in 2010-11."

-- "Published out-of-state tuition and fees at public four-year colleges and universities average $20,770, $1,122 (5.7 percent) higher than in 2010-11."

-- "Published in-state tuition and fees at public two-year colleges average $2,963, $236 (8.7 percent) higher than in 2010-11.

-- "Published tuition and fees at private nonprofit four-year colleges and universities average $28,500 in 2011-12, $1,235 (4.5 percent) higher than in 2010-11."

It also probably won't surprise many students and parents that when grant aid, federal tax credits and tax deductions are factored in, the average net cost of getting educated is up much less. For example, net tuition and fees at a public four-year universities this year average $2,490 — up 1.4 percent from last year.

But here's the problem, as The Associated Press says: With federal lawmakers pressed to cut the federal deficit, "the days of states and families relying on budget relief from Washington appear numbered."

Related news: President Obama "is outlining a plan Wednesday to allow millions of student loan recipients to lower their payments and consolidate their loans, in hopes of easing the burden of the No. 2 source of household debt."

Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Book Review: 'Born To Run,' Bruce Springsteen

Music critic Will Hermes reviews a new autobiography from Bruce Springsteen called Born To Run.
WAMU 88.5

A Matter Of Taste: What Prix Fixe Menus Say About D.C.'s Dining Scene

Is a meal for a special occasion worth hundreds of dollars?

NPR

Clinton-Trump Showdown Is Most-Watched Presidential Debate

An estimated 84 million people watched Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump in their first debate Monday, according to TV ratings data from Nielsen, making it the most-watched debate ever.
NPR

When Phones Went Mobile: Revisiting NPR's 1983 Story On 'Cellular'

The report titled "Cellular Phones Are Completely Mobile" features a man who was "among the first 1,500 customers to use a new mobile phone system called cellular."

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.