At Lululemon Trial, Prosecutor Reenacts Crime Scene | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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At Lululemon Trial, Prosecutor Reenacts Crime Scene

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Brittany Norwood is accused of killing her coworker, Jayna Murray, at the Bethesda yoga store where they both worked.
Montgomery County Police
Brittany Norwood is accused of killing her coworker, Jayna Murray, at the Bethesda yoga store where they both worked.

Update 5 p.m.: The prosecuting attorney was animated while making his case Wednesday, starting his opening statements by saying, "Jayna Murray's killer is in the room."

He went on to re-enact the scene of the murder, dropping to his knees to illustrate how the prosecution believes the events took place in March. He actually wielded one of the alleged murder weapons, and made stabbing motions.

The trial was supposed to wrap up for the day at 4:15 p.m., but continues at the time of reporting.

Update 2 p.m.: The attorney for Brittany Norwood acknowledged in his opening statement that Norwood killed her Lululemon coworker Jayna Murray, but argued that the crime was not premeditated. Norwood "lost control" during a fight with Murray, attorney Douglas Wood told the jury during his opening statement. The prosecution showed photos of Murray's body at the crime scene during opening statements.

Montgomery County State's Attorney John McCarthy and his team began presenting the prosecution's case this afternoon, providing gory details from the crime scene. Murray's body had 322 injuries, and 107 defense wounds, the prosecution told the court. Attorneys for the state also listed eight murder weapons, including a hammer, knife, box cutter, and rope. 

Update 11:30 a.m.: A jury has been seated in the trial of Brittany Norwood, Lululemon employee accused of killing her coworker at the Bethesda yoga store in March. A total of 17 jurors -- 12 jurors and five alternates -- were selected in a process that started with nearly 300 people and took more than two days.  

Late yesterday, a judge barred prosecutors from using especially graphic photos during his opening statement in the murder trial of Brittany Norwood. Montgomery County Circuit Judge Robert Greenberg decided to limit the prosecutor's use of graphic photographs in his opening statement, saying that they may make jurors emotional and cause them to tune out testimony. These photos include close-up shots of the dead pf victim Jayna Murray, who was reportedly beaten with a wrench, according to the Associated Press.

The judge said other pictures were permissible, including one showing Norwood as she was found inside the shop after police were called.

Prosecutors say the two women argued after closing hours when Murray found suspected stolen merchandise inside Norwood's bag. They say Norwood tried to conceal the killing by staging her own attack and telling police that the women had been attacked inside the shop by two masked men.

The jury selection process was difficult because of extensive media coverage of the case. More than two-thirds of potential jurors surveyed on Monday said they had heard about the alleged murder. For that reason, the judge banned jurors from watching television, browsing the internet and participating in social media.

The trial is expected to last at least another week.

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