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Maryland Beats Virginia In Energy Ranking

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When it comes to energy efficiency, Virginia and D.C. could learn a thing or two from Maryland.
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When it comes to energy efficiency, Virginia and D.C. could learn a thing or two from Maryland.

Maryland was recognized by the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy this month -- jumping six spots in the group's annual ranking to number 10. The 2008 Empower Maryland Act was credited for the move. It requires utilities to help consumers save energy by retrofitting homes to be more efficient.

Michael Sciortino, senior research analyst at ACEEE, produced the ranking. He says Virginia is far behind, at number 34.

"Virginia has strong building energy codes, so they're building smart from the start," he says. "But businesses and homeowners don't really have a lot of opportunity to use rebates for efficient appliances, or lighting. They sort of have to do it on their own. So really, across the board, other than building energy codes, it's not really doing much."

Sciortino had high marks for the District, which came in at 22 for its sustainable energy utility, which helps customers find ways to save energy.

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