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Stores Empty At Prince William Food Pantry

Donations needed urgently

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Steven Depolo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/stevendepolo/3511460735/

Citing a lack of inventory, a Prince William County, Virginia food pantry is temporarily closing for business. The Action in Community Through Service -- or ACTS -- food pantry in Dumfries announced Tuesday they are shutting down until November 1.

The non-profit is in need of food and cash donations in order to open back up. ACTS leaders say this means more than 1,000 people won't get their monthly food supply.

 

"I’m disabled and I have my grandkids with me -- their parents are unfortunately incarcerated," says a woman named Juanita, who uses the pantry. "I need the help. I need the help.”

Manager Taylor Lenz says there has been a huge influx in the number of clients in the last three months -- a forty percent increase. The pantry will continue to provide donated bread, fruit and vegetables until it can reopen.

 

Make a donation of food or cash to ACTS today. Call 703-441-8606 ext 212, e-mail tbenjamin@actspwc.org or go to the ACTS website.

 

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