First Responders Train For Terrorism, Emergency Rescues | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

First Responders Train For Terrorism, Emergency Rescues

Play associated audio
Army helicopters worked alongside area first responders in Capital Shield 2012, an inter-agency emergency management exercise.
U.S. Army: http://www.flickr.com/photos/soldiersmediacenter/4308562661/
Army helicopters worked alongside area first responders in Capital Shield 2012, an inter-agency emergency management exercise.

First responders in the D.C. area are sharpening their skills, testing their mettle, and building important interdepartmental relationships in the "Capital Shield" region exercises Wednesday. As part of the exercise, fire departments, police, military and even actors are brought together to play out mock terrorist attacks and other disasters.

"Helicopters are coming in to evacuate casualties that we are starting to extract from the buildings," says Cory Wright, an Army specialist with the Joint Forces, of the drill. "Some have gone through chemical decon, others has just been traumatized by some of the debris."

First responders from Fairfax County, Loudoun County and the District are trying to rescue mock victims from buildings set up to look like they’ve been attacked.

Fairfax County Fire & EMS Battalion Chief Paul Ruwe oversees men and women who are using saws and jack hammers to free victims. He says efforts such as Capital Shield help the region's first responders practice working together.

"It’s incredibly important when we respond to the big events, obviously 9/11 proved that when we know everybody before a major event occurs, we work that much more smoothly," says Ruwe. "We know the names. We know the faces."

And knowing names and faces, says the Battalion Chief, helps with that split-second decision of assigning tasks in a life-threatening situation.

NPR

If Robots 'Speak,' Will We Listen? Novel Imagines A Future Changed By AI

As artificial intelligence alters human connection, Louisa Hall's characters wrestle with whether machines can truly feel. Some "feel they have to stand up for a robot's right to exist," Hall says.
NPR

Aphrodisiacs Can Spark Sexual Imagination, But Probably Not Libido

Going on a picnic with someone special? Make sure to pack watermelon, a food that lore says is an aphrodisiac. No food is actually scientifically linked to desire, but here's how some got that rep.
NPR

Trump's Campaign Theme Song Headache? Blame Michael Jackson, Sort Of

Candidates keep getting in trouble for picking theme songs without getting approval from the artist. You can trace this back to changes in both campaigning and the way companies sell products.
NPR

In A Twist, Tech Companies Are Outsourcing Computer Work To ... Humans

A new trend is sweeping the tech world: hiring real people. NPR's Arun Rath talks to Wired reporter Julia Greenberg about why tech giants are learning to trust human instinct instead of algorithms.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.