NPR : News

Filed Under:

A Hard-Times Journey: Where Should NPR Go?

Americans are worried. Fourteen million people are unemployed. Wages are flat. And there's concern about a double-dip recession. But for many Americans, it feels like the last recession never ended.

And many economists don't expect a real turnaround anytime soon. They call it "The New Normal" or "The Great Stagnation."

The country has always come back from hard times. Is this time different?

Next month — a year out from the 2012 election — NPR will hit the road to see what Americans have to say. We'll visit small towns and big cities around the country to hear from people about their experiences in this economy. We'll talk to them about jobs and joblessness, money, raising children during uncertain times, running a business, and more.

Correspondents Richard Gonzales and Debbie Elliott will report from across the country, visiting places and talking with Americans we don't often hear from.

We're asking our audience to help. Tell us what stories you want to hear and where you think we ought to go. As the series unfolds, you can follow @NPRhardtimes on Twitter.

Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Father-Son's Carpool Karaoke Of 'Quando, Quando, Quando' Leads To Record Deal

Ted McDermott struggles with Alzheimer's, but loves to sing. His son Simon recorded the two of them singing a Carpool Karaoke. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Simon.
NPR

Sunday Sports: Baseball Season Stats

As the baseball season enters the homestretch, Mike Pesca, host of The Gist podcast shares obscure baseball stats and somewhat dubious accomplishments with NPR's Rachel Martin.
NPR

Donald Trump's Run Isn't Dampening Ohio Republican Senate Race

Donald Trump's campaign is not weighing down Republican Senate candidates across the country as Democrats had initially hoped. In Ohio, the GOP Senate candidate has a big lead over the Democrat.
NPR

Facebook Group Launched To Combat KKK Presence In Pennsylvania Town

Jaimi Hajzus was alarmed to learn that KKK fliers were dropped on lawns in her hometown of Coudersport, Pa. She tells NPR's Rachel Martin of a Facebook campaign to counter the hate group.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.