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Floods Destroy Woodbridge, Demolition Could Take Weeks

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Beranek (in blue) says each dumpster gets filled and hauled to the landfill 4-5 times each day.
Jonathan Wilson
Beranek (in blue) says each dumpster gets filled and hauled to the landfill 4-5 times each day.

Demolition efforts have started at a trailer park in Woodbridge, more than a month after flooding caused by Tropical Storm Lee decimated the property.

Scott Beranek, owner of a home improvement company, is volunteering his expertise and labor to take homes apart. Other local companies have helped out by donating heavy equipment. Beranek says without the donations, the flood victims would have to pay for the demolition themselves.

He says the mess is so massive at Holly Acres Mobile Home Park that it will take nearly a month to clean everything up. He also says he could still use more help from companies that can haul trash away.

"We're not asking every company to step up and donate a ton, but if they could donate ten dumpsters," says Beranek. "Ten dumpsters, ten hauls."

Beranek is also recycling the scrap metal he finds on the site. He says it could be worth thousands of dollars, and that's money he hopes to split amongst the families whose homes were ruined in the flood.

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