Perdue Farms Unveils Massive Solar Panel Project | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Perdue Farms Unveils Massive Solar Panel Project

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A giant solar panel array has been unveiled at poultry giant Perdue’s corporate headquarters on Maryland's Eastern Shore. Governor Martin O’Malley was there to help showcase the state's green efforts.

More than 5,000 solar panels cover six acres at Perdue’s Salisbury headquarters. Add the 11,000 panels that power the chicken plants at the Bridgeville, Delaware facility, and you have the second-largest solar powered project of its kind in the eastern U.S.

Governor Martin O’Malley says convincing Marylanders on the merits of the green movement starts with projects like this: “To have an established Maryland company like Perdue stepping up and embracing solar sends a message throughout the entire business community and throughout the entire agricultural sector of Maryland that this is real -- that solar energy is here and you can do it in a cost effective way.”

O’Malley says solar energy is essential if the state hopes to make renewable energy goals by 2022.

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