U.S. Tells California's Pot Shops To Close Down, Or Face Charges | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : News

Filed Under:

U.S. Tells California's Pot Shops To Close Down, Or Face Charges

Pot dispensaries have flourished in California, one of 16 states where the use of medical marijuana is legal. But the federal government is now giving some of the state's pot shops 45 days to close down.

The state's four U.S. attorneys gave notice to at least 16 stores that they must close, or face criminal charges and the seizure of their property, according to the Associated Press.

The letters likely stem from a Department of Justice memo sent to U.S. attorneys, instructing them that people "who are in the business of cultivating, selling or distributing marijuana, and those who knowingly facilitate such activities, are in violation of the Controlled Substances Act, regardless of state law."

The AP obtained some of the letters sent to pot dispensaries this week, which reportedly state that federal law "takes precedence over state law... and applies regardless of the particular uses for which a dispensary is selling and distributing marijuana."

Greg Anton, a lawyer for a pot dispensary in Marin, Calif., tells the AP that the shop's owner "has been paying state and federal taxes for 14 years, and they have cashed all the checks."

"All I hear from Obama is whining about his budget," Anton said, "but he has money to do this — which will actually reduce revenues."

Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Wounded Bull-Runner: 'If You Run Long Enough, You Get Gored'

Bill Hillmann, a writer from Chicago, contributed to the book Fiesta: How to Survive the Bulls of Pamplona. He was gored at this year's running of the bulls in that city, but says he plans to return.
NPR

What If The World Cup Were Awarded For Saving Trees And Drinking Soda?

We thought you'd get a kick out of seeing how the four teams in the final World Cup matches stack up in global health and development.
NPR

What Could $100 Million Buy You — Besides Campaign Ads In Kentucky?

Spending on the Kentucky Senate race might reach $100 million. So what else could that get you in the Bluegrass State? NPR's Tamara Keith finds out when she calls up some local business owners.
NPR

Looking For Free Sperm, Women May Turn To Online Forums

Bypassing commercial sperm banks, thousands are logging on to websites where women can connect with men at no cost. Anecdotes abound, but the scope of the unregulated activity is unclear.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.