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Washington Monument Climbers Finish Up

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Engineers captivated the region with the daredevil rappelling techniques they utilized to inspect the outside of the Washington Monument. Inspections ended Wednesday.
Armando Trull
Engineers captivated the region with the daredevil rappelling techniques they utilized to inspect the outside of the Washington Monument. Inspections ended Wednesday.

Engineers have wrapped up their inspection of the Washington Monument following damage from the 5.8-magnitude earthquake on Aug. 23. The National Park Service says the team that has been rappelling from the top of the monument finished its survey Wednesday morning. The engineers have been removing stone and mortar shaken loosened by the quake.

Park service officials have said the engineers will provide a report that will help determine how the monument should be repaired. The earthquake caused numerous cracks to form in the 127-year-old obelisk, but the engineers have said it remains structurally sound.

The inspection began a week ago, but weather caused some delays and complications. On Friday, one engineer was blown about 30 feet off the monument's face by a gust of wind. He was not injured.

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