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Verdict Is Murder For Va. Grandmother

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A jury in Virginia found Carmela dela Rosa, 50, guilty of the murder of her 2-year-old granddaughter, denying the defense's claim of insanity.
A jury in Virginia found Carmela dela Rosa, 50, guilty of the murder of her 2-year-old granddaughter, denying the defense's claim of insanity.

A jury has convicted a Northern Virginia grandmother of first-degree murder for tossing her 2-year-old granddaughter to her death from a pedestrian bridge last November at Tysons Corner Mall.

The jury recommended a 35-year sentence, and prosecutors are seeking life. A judge will sentence her in January.

A day after hearing closing arguments, the Fairfax County jury rejected a claim Thursday that 50-year-old Carmela dela Rosa of Fairfax was insane at the time she threw young Angelyn Ogdoc off the 45-foot skywalk at Tysons Corner Center.

Prosecutors said dela Rosa clearly understood right from wrong and was motivated by anger at her son-in-law for getting her daughter pregnant out of wedlock.

Defense witnesses testified that dela Rosa was diagnosed with severe depression and tried to kill herself on several occasions in the months before the incident.

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