WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Statewide Broadband Network Goes Live In Rural Md.

Play associated audio
Maryland senator Barbara Mikulski and governor Martin O'Malley receive a demonstration of the state's broadband internet network at the La Plata state police barracks in Charles County.
Matt Bush
Maryland senator Barbara Mikulski and governor Martin O'Malley receive a demonstration of the state's broadband internet network at the La Plata state police barracks in Charles County.

Leaders in Maryland are celebrating the launch of a statewide broadband Internet network. The state police barracks in La Plata, Charles County is the first site in Maryland to go "live" on the broadband network.

Patrolling the rural county can at times leave troopers all alone, but now the barracks can see cameras in patrol cars in real time. While that will help with public safety, governor Martin O'Malley says the biggest benefit may be that all schools will be eventually be connected to the network.

"In these times when debates in a lot of other state capitals and communities are all about cut, cut, cut, cut, cut...we say don't cut our children's future," says O'Malley. "Make these investments today."

Charles County may be the best example of this, says O'Malley, as the network will allow Mt. Hope-Nanjemoy Elementary school to receive broadband internet.  Currently, it is the only school in the county that doesn't have it due to its remote location.

Federal stimulus dollars are paying for the network. Senator Barbara Mikulski believes it can be an example for the many other areas of the country that are seeing similar transformations. She believes better broadband connections will mean more jobs, but she says that is something Republicans on Capitol Hill fighting the president's jobs plan don't see.

"My concern is that they're so busy trying to make sure he loses his job, that we're not fighting to create jobs for people," says Mikulski. "That's got to be our number one priority: private sector jobs. Broadband is like the railroad.  It lays the groundwork."

NPR

Lisa Lucas Takes The Reins At The National Book Foundation

Lucas is the third executive director in the history of the foundation, which runs the National Book Awards. Her priority? Inclusivity: "Everyone is either a reader or a potential reader," she says.
NPR

The Shocking Truth About America's Ethanol Law: It Doesn't Matter (For Now)

Ted Cruz doesn't like the law that requires the use of ethanol in gasoline. So what would happen if it was abolished? The surprising answer: not much, probably.
WAMU 88.5

The Latest on the Military, Political and Humanitarian Crises in Syria

Russia continues airstrikes in Syria. Secretary Kerry meets with world leaders in an attempt to resolve the country’s five-year civil war. A panel joins Diane to discuss the latest on the military, political and humanitarian crises facing Syria.

NPR

Twitter Tries A New Kind Of Timeline By Predicting What May Interest You

Twitter has struggled to attract new users. Its latest effort at rejuvenation is a new kind of timeline that predicts which older posts you might not want to miss and displays them on top.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.