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Two More Mushroom Poisoning Cases Reported

Several people in the D.C. area have been poisoned by mushrooms in the amanita family, such as these "death cap" mushrooms, this week.
Kathie Hodge (http://www.flickr.com/photos/cornellfungi/472539114/)
Several people in the D.C. area have been poisoned by mushrooms in the amanita family, such as these "death cap" mushrooms, this week.

Two more D.C. area residents have been diagnosed with mushroom poisoning after ingesting mushrooms found in the wild, NBC Washington reports.

Georgetown University Hospital had admitted two men with mushroom toxicity over the weekend, and two women were stricken with similar poisoning Monday. The women, who ate what doctors believe were "avenging angel" mushroom they found at a farm in Warrenton, Va., were treated with the same experimental medicine doctors used to treat the first two cases. 

All of the mushrooms that have sickened people so far -- the others have aliases including "death cap" and "destroying angel," have been from the amanita family, which can cause significant liver and kidney damage, as well as vomiting and nausea.

One of the previous victims, Frank Constantinopla of Springfield, Va., told NBC Washington that he thought it was safe to eat the mushrooms because it is commonplace in his home country of the Phillipines to eat mushrooms that sprout outdoors after a heavy rain. 

Medical officials are warning people not to eat mushrooms they find in the wild.

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