Shanghai Subway Crash Renews Questions About Safety In China | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Shanghai Subway Crash Renews Questions About Safety In China

There's been another train crash in China — this time a collision of subway trains in Shanghai earlier today. The accident injured more than 200 people.

It's yet another blow to China's image.

As NPR's Louisa Lim reported Monday on All Things Considered in a piece about the recent collision between high-speed trains, China's "Great Leap Forward" mentality toward development may be "clashing with questions of safety."

Today's crash, ABC News adds, has some Chinese "Netizens" incensed:

"Because Twitter is blocked in Mainland China, many people have turned to its Chinese counterpart, Sina Weibo, to vent their anger.

" 'Last time one train on Line 2 went into the wrong direction,' a Sina Weibo user named 'China' wrote. 'They said they were fine-tuning it, and there would be no crashes. How could they explain it now?'

" 'Accidents one after another, what happened to China!' Sina Weibo user 'Jiaboshi' wrote.

" 'Faulty products are threatening our lives!' 'Kanlai9851' wrote."

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