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Public Input Needed For D.C. Sustainability

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Adam Fagen: http://www.flickr.com/photos/afagen/2757964105/

Start in September is the kickoff of a new sustainability planning effort for Washington, D.C., and Mayor Vincent Gray is asking the public to pitch in.

Harriet Tregoning, the District’s director of planning, says she’s already heard plenty of good ideas, from planting more fruit trees to protecting city parks. And she hopes to hear more.

“We think we’ve got a lot smart people and businesses in the District, and the beginning of this planning process is to ask people, what are your ideas, what are your aspirations in making this a more sustainable city,” Tregoning says.

"The mayor wants to make sure that everybody knows what we’re hoping to accomplish is informed by their ideas and ultimately we’re marching into the future together to make sure this is the most sustainable city in the country," says D.C. Department of the Environment director Christophe Tulou.

After all, Tulou says sustainability isn't just about protecting the environment. It's about attracting new residents and driving the local economy. 

"What we want to do is create an environment no matter what your position in life you want to park yourself here in Washington," he says. 

Tulou is calling on residents to hold community discussions to come up with green strategies, and then submit their ideas through the city’s new sustainability website

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