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So What Is The Salt?

Welcome to The Salt, NPR's shiny new food blog, brought to you by NPR's Science Desk. But it's not just any food blog.

This blog is about what we eat and why we eat it.

We'll be serving up culture and science, farming and business, along with a side of skepticism and a dash of panache.

We'll celebrate food, but also take a hard look at where it comes from, how it gets here, and what it does to us and the planet.

We want to know not just the good, but the bad and the ugly stuff, too.

At The Salt, look for things that will pique your tastebuds, make you smile, and sometimes, even spit.

I'll be hosting, editing and posting on The Salt, with lots of assists from Food Correspondent Allison Aubrey, Agriculture Correspondent Dan Charles, and many more.

We're also taking full advantage of NPR's multimedia talents, so watch for special photos, slideshows, and audio and video highlights that will enhance our stories.

Wrapping it all together is Science Desk Deputy Supervising Senior Editor Alison Richards, an award-winning science journalist and the author of "The New Book of Apples."

So add us to your daily diet and tell us what you want to read about. Contact The Salt through the comments section or drop us a line at thesalt dot npr dot org. Follow us and all the great NPR food coverage on Twitter @NPRFood.

Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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