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Metro Employee Fired For Taking Vehicle

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A Metro employee is fired for lying about his assignments and for using a company vehicle for personal activities.
Wayan Vota
A Metro employee is fired for lying about his assignments and for using a company vehicle for personal activities.

A Metro employee has been fired for taking home an agency-owned vehicle.

According to a Metro inspector general report, the unidentified technician was caught driving the vehicle home, and then staying there during work hours.

The report also indicated the technician entered false activities and locations into his work assignment database in order to make it appear as if he was working at areas in the system. The scam reportedly continued for a period of years.

Metro has a pool of approximately 131 vehicles that can be driven home, and 117 employees are expected to drive vehicles home as part of their jobs.

An agency spokesperson says the vehicle used by the technician - who had been with the agency for just over 12 years - was not part of the take-home program.

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