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Will It Tip Over? Norwegian Cruise Ship Listing Dangerously After Fire

Update at 9:50 a.m. ET: Workers have been able to reduce the ship's list to about 17 degrees, Norway's VG-TV reports. That brings it below the "critical line" of 20 degrees, at which tipping over was thought to be a serious danger.

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Norway's VG-TV is streaming video from the scene as workers try to keep the cruise ship MS Nordlys from tipping over.

As The Associated Press writes, a fire on board Thursday "killed two crew and forced the evacuation of 260 other people" as the ship was preparing to dock in Aalesund, about 230 miles northwest of Oslo. It's thought that there was an explosion in the engine room.

"Thick black smoke billowed from the stern of the ship, operated by the Hurtigruten line, when it sailed into Aalesund," the AP adds.

Now, the ship is "listing nearly 22 degrees after taking on too much water," the Norway International Network reports. According to the AP, 20 degrees "is considered a critical line."

Russia Today is among the news outlets with video of the smoke pouring out of the ship as it came to port.

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