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Serena Williams Fined After U.S. Open Outburst

The United States Tennis Association announced today that Serena Williams would be fined $2,000, after she verbally abused chair umpire Eva Asderaki during a U.S. Open match yesterday.

"After independently reviewing the incident which served as the basis for the code violation, and taking into account the level of fine imposed by the U.S. Open referee, the Grand Slam Committee Director has determined that Ms. Williams' conduct, while verbally abusive, does not rise to the level of a major offense under the Grand Slam Code of Conduct," the USTA said in a statement according to Reuters.

This isn't the first outburst from Williams. She was already on probabtion after she laid into an umpire in 2009.

From ESPN, here's a series of things that Williams told Asderaki yesterday:

-- "Aren't you the one who screwed me over last time here? Do you have it out for me? That's totally not cool."

-- "Really, don't even look at me."

-- "Later, as her tirade escalated, Williams defended her right to vent, saying, 'We're in America last time I checked.' In a final jab, she called Asderaki 'unattractive inside.'

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