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Russian Hockey Player Dies; Was Only Member Of Team To Survive Crash

"The only member of a top Russian hockey team to survive a plane crash that killed 44 people died Monday of his injuries in a Moscow hospital," The Canadian Press and The Hockey News report.

Alexander Galimov, 26, "died of the severe burns that covered about 90 percent of his body," the news outlets add. He played the forward position.

The team's plane crashed last Wednesday (Sept. 7, 2011), shortly after takeoff from the city of Yaroslavl. Other members of Lokomotiv, an elite professional hockey team, included NHL veterans Pavol Demitra of Slovakia, Ruslan Salei of Belarus and Josef Vasicek of the Czech Republic. The coach, Canadian Brad McCrimmon, was also killed.

One person who was on the flight is still alive. "Flight crew member Alexander Sizov, remained in intensive care at Moscow's Sklifosovsky hospital," The Canadian Press and Hockey News add.

Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

'Kids Love To Be Scared': Louis Sachar On Balancing Fun And Fear

The award-winning author of Holes has just published a new novel for young readers, called Fuzzy Mud. It mixes middle-school social puzzles with a more sinister mystery: a rogue biotech threat.
NPR

Confronting A Shortage Of Eggs, Bakers Get Creative With Replacements

Eggs are becoming more expensive and scarce recently because so many chickens have died from avian flu. So bakers, in particular, are looking for cheaper ingredients that can work just as well.
WAMU 88.5

How Artificial Intelligence And Robots Will Impact Jobs And How We Think About Work

Many experts say artificial intelligence and robots will displace jobs at a faster and faster pace over the coming decade. What changes in technology could mean for how we work.

WAMU 88.5

How Artificial Intelligence And Robots Will Impact Jobs And How We Think About Work

Many experts say artificial intelligence and robots will displace jobs at a faster and faster pace over the coming decade. What changes in technology could mean for how we work.

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