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Remembering And Living After 9/11

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The tenth anniversary of 9/11 brought rememberance and heighten security. 
The George W. Bush Presidential Library
The tenth anniversary of 9/11 brought rememberance and heighten security. 

The tenth anniversary ceremony at the Pentagon was closed to the public, and security around the building was turning vehicles and pedestrians away without express permission to be on hand.

Michael Coulston works at the Pentagon and was riding his bike nearby before the ceremony. He says he was glad to see extra police out and about, but he's isn't worried about a terrorist attack today, here or anywhere else.

"Not at all," Coulston says. "I'm going to the baseball game this afternoon as a matter of fact ."

Jody Muldoon, a resident of Syracuse, N.Y., is in town visiting her daughter. The whole family was catching the Metro at Crystal City and headed downtown. She says being in the D.C. area today is special, and worrying about safety too much would be a waste.

"They could hit anybody, anywhere, anytime," Muldoon says. "We can't dig a hole and put our heads in the sand. That's all I can say." 

 

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