For Veterans, The Tough Climb Back To Civilian Life | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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For Veterans, The Tough Climb Back To Civilian Life

The lasting legacies of Sept. 11 are numerous — sometimes elusive. There's the altered New York City skyline and the ongoing war. There also are wounded soldiers coming home from Iraq and Afghanistan each year to face a new battle: Fitting back into civilian life.

Rehabilitation programs exist for those returning with physical wound, but little support exists for those with invisible wounds such as post-traumatic stress disorder.

A few programs, though, have started popping up around the country to address PTSD. In Colorado Springs, Colo., for example, hundreds of Fort Carson soldiers are taking part in an intense physical training program offered by a nonprofit called LifeQuest Transitions.

NPR photographer David Gilkey spent two days there to get a better idea of how the program works.

This story is part of a larger package from Colorado Public Radio and Rocky Mountain PBS about the lasting impact of Sept. 11. See the entire program, called Colorado Focus.

Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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