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Concrete Barriers Linger At Alexandria Courthouse

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In the days after 9/11, temporary security measures cropped up all over the Washington metropolitan region, including many sites with concrete barriers that have now been replaced by permanent bollards.

One location is stuck in the past.

The Albert Bryan federal courthouse in Alexandria, Va. is still surrounded by temporary concrete barriers a decade after 9/11, creating what many consider an eyesore at one of the region's highest profile courts. This is the place where Zacarias Moussaoui was convicted of being part of the 9/11 attacks.

Officials with with the U.S. Marshals service say the reason for the decade-long delay was created by overlapping stakeholders -- the city of Alexandria, the federal government and the private landowner where the court is located. Ten years ago, Norfolk Southern Railroad owned the land. Now the landlord is the Carlyle Group, a global asset management firm.

The marshals service says a plan is under consideration to create a permanent security perimeter at the courthouse and take away the concrete traffic barricades.

NPR

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NPR

Domino's Pizza Tests Drone Delivery In New Zealand

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All Mixed Up: What Do We Call People Of Multiple Backgrounds?

The share of multiracial children in America has multiplied tenfold in the past 50 years. It's a good time to take stock of our shared vocabulary when it comes to describing Americans like me.
WAMU 88.5

A Cyber-Psychologist Explains How Human Behavior Changes Online

Dr. Mary Aiken, a pioneering cyber-psychologist, work inspired the CBS television series "CSI: Cyber". She explains how going online changes our behavior in small and dramatic ways, and what that means for how we think about our relationship with technology.

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