Concrete Barriers Linger At Alexandria Courthouse | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Concrete Barriers Linger At Alexandria Courthouse

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In the days after 9/11, temporary security measures cropped up all over the Washington metropolitan region, including many sites with concrete barriers that have now been replaced by permanent bollards.

One location is stuck in the past.

The Albert Bryan federal courthouse in Alexandria, Va. is still surrounded by temporary concrete barriers a decade after 9/11, creating what many consider an eyesore at one of the region's highest profile courts. This is the place where Zacarias Moussaoui was convicted of being part of the 9/11 attacks.

Officials with with the U.S. Marshals service say the reason for the decade-long delay was created by overlapping stakeholders -- the city of Alexandria, the federal government and the private landowner where the court is located. Ten years ago, Norfolk Southern Railroad owned the land. Now the landlord is the Carlyle Group, a global asset management firm.

The marshals service says a plan is under consideration to create a permanent security perimeter at the courthouse and take away the concrete traffic barricades.

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