WAMU 88.5 : News

Rep. Bobby Scott Won't Run For Senate

Play associated audio
 Rep. Bobby Scott (D-Va.) chairs a House Committee on Education and the Workforce hearing in 2009. Scott will not run for a U.S. Senate seat in 2012, he announced Sept. 5. 
http://www.flickr.com/photos/edlabordems/3352095330/
 Rep. Bobby Scott (D-Va.) chairs a House Committee on Education and the Workforce hearing in 2009. Scott will not run for a U.S. Senate seat in 2012, he announced Sept. 5. 

 

Virginia Democrat Rep. Bobby Scott has decided against running for U.S. Senate, he said Monday. 

During an annual Democratic Labor Day Picnic in Newport News, Va., Scott, a 10-term representative, instead endorsed Democratic former Gov. Tim Kaine for the 2012 race.

Scott had hinted at a possible run for the seat Sen. Jim Webb will vacate with his retirement after only one term, saying he'd make up his mind this summer. He waited until the traditional end-of-summer holiday to announce his decision. 

In a statement, Scott said though he believes he can win the nomination and the general election -- he wasn't willing to postpone his work in Congress for the 14 months required to run a winning campaign. Scott also said the drawn-out redistricting process in Virginia had played a role in his decision not to run. Congressional redistricting is still ongoing in the state, and lawmakers will take up various plans again this fall.

Kaine holds prohibitive fundraising and name recognition advantages over untested opposition for his party's nomination in the marquee 2012 race in Virginia, a new presidential battleground. 

Among Republicans, former Gov. George Allen has a commanding polling and fundraising edge on the GOP field, including Virginia tea party leader Jamie Radtke. 

 

NPR

Opulent And Apolitical: The Art Of The Met's Islamic Galleries

Navina Haidar, an Islamic art curator at the Met, says she isn't interested in ideology: "The only place where we allow ourselves any passion is in the artistic joy ... of something that's beautiful."
NPR

Tired Of The Seoul-Sucking Rat Race, Koreans Flock To Farming

More than 80 percent of people in South Korea live in cities. But in the past few years, there has been a shift. Tens of thousands of South Koreans are relocating to the countryside each year.
WAMU 88.5

Virginia Republicans Warn Of High Energy Costs With Obama's 'Clean Power Plan'

Republican leaders in Virginia say Obama's clean energy plan would drive up energy costs and damage a struggling economy. Democrats say saving the planet is more important than the short-term problem of higher energy bills.
NPR

Hope Or Hype: The Revolution In Africa Will Be Wireless

Young entrepreneurs in Africa say that they're leading a tech movement from the ground up. They think technology can solve social ills. But critics wonder if digital fixes can make a dent.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.