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O'Malley: Recent Crises Proof of Md. Emergency Readiness

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Maryland governor Martin O'Malley speaks during a cabinet meeting at the state house in Annapolis.
Matt Bush
Maryland governor Martin O'Malley speaks during a cabinet meeting at the state house in Annapolis.

Maryland governor Martin O'Malley says the response to Hurricane Irene and last month's earthquake shows how far the state has come in improving its response to emergencies since the 9/11 attacks.

During a cabinet meeting in Annapolis, the governor received a report detailing what went right and what didn't following Hurricane Irene. O'Malley pointed out one item in particular he was happy about.

"You didn't have one story about a nursing home that had to be evacuated in the middle of high winds and trees falling down because they lost power and had people on respirators," notes O'Malley. "The reason you didn't have those stories was because all of our nursing homes are required to have backup power generation."

The head of the state emergency management agency says they still have work to do to make sure their computer system doesn't get overloaded during heavy response times. He adds they will stay on heightened alert through this Sunday's 10th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, though there are no credible threats to public safety because of the anniversary.

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