Attorneys For Lululemon Suspect Say She Wasn't Informed Of Rights | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Attorneys For Lululemon Suspect Say She Wasn't Informed Of Rights

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Attorneys for Brittany Norwood allege that their client was not properly informed of her rights prior to making statements to the police.
Montgomery County Police
Attorneys for Brittany Norwood allege that their client was not properly informed of her rights prior to making statements to the police.

Two detectives who interviewed a woman who claimed to have been attacked inside a Bethesda yoga clothing shop said they treated her as a victim and not as a suspect in the death of her co-worker, according to an AP report.

Brittany Norwood is charged with killing co-worker Jayna Murray inside the Lululemon Athletica shop in March.

Her lawyers are asking a Montgomery County judge to suppress five statements she made to investigators after Murray's body was found. They say she should have been advised of her rights since Norwood had been identified as a possible suspect.

But the two detectives said Friday that isn't the case, and that Norwood was initially interviewed strictly as a victim.

Norwood's trial is scheduled to begin Oct. 24. Her attorneys have signaled they intend to present an insanity defense.

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