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More Water Discovered in Washington Monument

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The earthquake caused some limestone blocks to be displaced at the Washington Monument. The National Park Service has repaired much of the damage, but leaks indicate they may not have found it all.
National Park Service
The earthquake caused some limestone blocks to be displaced at the Washington Monument. The National Park Service has repaired much of the damage, but leaks indicate they may not have found it all.

The National Park Service says engineers sealed cracks in the Washington Monument from last week's earthquake ahead of Hurricane Irene, but have discovered water inside that may indicate additional leaks.

Park Service spokeswoman Carol Johnson tells The Associated Press there was standing water on stairwells toward the top of the monument Monday when workers went back into the structure. Johnson says engineers haven't found any new cracks but are searching for the source of the leak.

The Park Service is awaiting another report from contract engineers who are experts in earthquake damage.

Federal News Radio reports engineers have installed a fence around the base of the monument because of a few thin layers of falling debris. Still, Johnson says the monument is structurally sound and "not going anywhere."

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