NPR : News

Muslim Americans 'Overwhelmingly' Satisfied With Their Lives, Poll Finds

"As the 10th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks approaches, a comprehensive public opinion survey finds no indication of increased alienation or anger among Muslim Americans in response to concerns about home-grown Islamic terrorists, controversies about the building of mosques and other pressures that have been brought to bear on this high-profile minority group in recent years," the Pew Research Center reports today.

And it adds that "there also is no evidence of rising support for Islamic extremism among Muslim Americans."

"As in 2007, very few Muslim Americans — just 1 percent — say that suicide bombing and other forms of violence against civilian targets are often justified to defend Islam from its enemies; an additional 7 percent say suicide bombings are sometimes justified in these circumstances," Pew reports. "Fully 81 percent say that suicide bombing and other forms of violence against civilians are never justified."

On the issue of support for extremism, Pew says that:

"A significant minority (21 percent of Muslim Americans say there is a great deal (6 percent) or a fair amount (15 percent) of support for extremism in the Muslim American community. That is far below the proportion of the general public that sees at least a fair amount of support for extremism among U.S. Muslims (40 percent). And while about a quarter of the public (24 percent) thinks that Muslim support for extremism is increasing, just 4% of Muslims agree."

Also, the study found that 82 percent of the 1,033 Muslim Americans who were surveyed said they are "satisfied ... with the way things are going" in their lives. Pew calls that an overwhelmingly optimistic response — and notes that it's higher than the 75 percent reading in its most recent survey of the general public.

Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Remembering Alan Cheuse, Our Longtime Literary Guide

For some 30 years, Alan Cheuse was our guide to the best and worst of the written word. He passed away today at 75, after a car accident two weeks ago. NPR's Susan Stamberg has an appreciation.
NPR

Pesticide Drift Threatens Organic Farms

Conventional farmers use millions of pounds of pesticides each year to protect crops from weeds and insects. When those chemicals drift to neighboring property, they can ruin crops on organic farms.
NPR

Planned Parenthood Controversy Raises Questions About Fetal Tissue Research

A series of sting videos targeting Planned Parenthood is raising questions about the field of fetal tissue research. Companies who buy and sell such tissue defend their work.
NPR

Letting Go Of The Wheel: How Google Is Easing People Into Self-Driving Cars

Google has begun testing a new self-driving car this summer that is designed to work without a steering wheel. But as the Planet Money team reports, the company's biggest challenge may be convincing Americans to hop inside.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.