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Ocean City Open For Business After Irene

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Businesses in Ocean City began to reopen Sunday afternoon, after shutting down Friday in advance of Hurricane Irene.
Bryan Russo
Businesses in Ocean City began to reopen Sunday afternoon, after shutting down Friday in advance of Hurricane Irene.

Businesses in Ocean City are beginning to reopen to the general public after being sparred by Hurricane Irene.

On Saturday, more than 12 inches of rain soaked the Delmarva Peninsula and hurricane force winds pummeled everything in this coastal region, causing flooding, and flying debris.

But by late Sunday morning, the sun came out.

Officials like City Manager Dennis Dare say that Ocean City is extremely lucky.

"Thankfully the storm deteriorated so much that it sparred Ocean City any major damage," says Dare. "And we've been able to quickly restore the town and open it back up in time for the great weather that’s coming up."

No injuries and minimal property damage have been reported, and city officials say the city's dune system, which serves as a natural levee, was predominantly unfazed by the storm surge.

Now, as a sea of cars line up to get back into Ocean City, the region is hoping to put the experience of Irene in their rearview mirrors.

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