Early Reports Say No Hurricane Related Injuries in Ocean City | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Early Reports Say No Hurricane Related Injuries in Ocean City

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Despite enduring substantial flooding, sustained winds of more than 60 miles per hour and wind gusts of 80 plus, Ocean City officials are reporting no injuries so far.
Bryan Russo
Despite enduring substantial flooding, sustained winds of more than 60 miles per hour and wind gusts of 80 plus, Ocean City officials are reporting no injuries so far.

Ocean City officials are scrambling to do a damage assessment of Hurricane Irene's impact.

A statement released by officials stationed at Ocean City's hurricane headquarters says the town is planning a full scale and rapid daylight inspection of the resort in hopes of opening Ocean City as soon as possible.

No injuries were reported, and the city's wastewater treatment plant has powered back up and is operational. However, power companies are saying approximately 150,000 people on the Eastern Shore and Coastal Delaware are still without power.

Ocean City endured substantial flooding from a sizable storm surge, sustained winds of more than 60 miles per hour and wind gusts of 80 plus.

More than a dozen members of the National Guard are assisting town officials with the early morning assessments of all that’s left standing.

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