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D.C. Shelters Remain Open For People Displaced By Irene

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Homeless shelters in the District are now open around the clock for those who who have been displaced by Hurricane Irene.
Armando Trull
Homeless shelters in the District are now open around the clock for those who who have been displaced by Hurricane Irene.

All of the homeless shelters in the District are now open around the clock, and arrangements have been made to house anyone whose home has been damaged by Hurricane Irene.

On a typical weekend, the indoor basketball courts at the Kennedy Recreation Center in northwest, D.C. would be full. But as Irene arrives, a lone dribbler is one of several dozen volunteers who have helped turned the facility into a shelter for any District resident who becomes displaced.

"We've had the American Red Cross drop a trailer for us, says Randy Moses, with the District’s Department of Human Services. "And it's a trailer of special needs. In that trailer, we have blankets, cots – heavy-duty cots that will support 300 lbs. or more. We have heater meals, which are ready-to-eat meals. We have snacks, and we have water."

Moses says there are three more shelters in the District that are ready to open their doors as well.

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