News Archive | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

News Archive - August 26, 2011

Barbershop: King's Legacy, Civil Rights, Gay Rights

With this week's unveiling of the MLK, Jr. Memorial on the National Mall, the Barbershop guys weigh in on what King's legacy means today. They also debate whether gay rights and civil rights are the same. Host Michel Martin talks with author Jimi Izrael, civil rights attorney Arsalan Iftikhar, syndicated columnist Ruben Navarrette, and Latina Magazine Vice President Javier Morgado.

Libyan Rebels Gain Ground, Perry Leads U.S. Polls

Rebels' advances in Libya are renewing praise and criticism for the country's leader. Americans are questioning how Barack Obama's support of the rebels will affect his 2012 presidential campaign. And Texas Governor Rick Perry is changing the picture for the GOP presidential candidates. Host Michel Martin talks politics with Politico's Cornell Belcher and Republican strategist Ron Christie.

Desperation Grips Children In Horn Of Africa

Famine is driving Somalis out of the country by the tens of thousands. Many are seeking shelter in Kenyan refugee camps. Humanitarian agencies are facing intense pressure, and medical staff are receiving malnourished children. Aid is getting through, but the U.N. says more money is needed. NPR Foreign Correspondent Ofeibea Quist-Arcton speaks with host Michel Martin.

'Godfather Of Go-Go' Celebrates 75th Birthday

Chuck Brown says turning 75 is a wonderful feeling. He's also thrilled about receiving a tribute from the National Symphony Orchestra during a concert next month. He and NSO Principal Pops Conductor Steven Reineke discuss music with host Michel Martin. Brown even plays some music that influenced his style.

Drought Puts Texas Ranchers, And Cattle, At Risk

At an East Texas auction, the animals look pitiful. They're standing in 107-degree heat with their ribs showing, stressed out. The heat, and no rain, has forced many ranchers to sell off their stock. Many will retire; and few young ranchers are ready to step in.

Will Libyan Rebels Stay United After Gadhafi Is Gone?

The Libyan rebel government calls itself the Transitional National Council. Political scientist Ali Ahmida talks to Renee Montagne about whether the rebel's leadership will remain united once Moammar Gadhafi's regime is defeated. Ahmida is author of The Making of Modern Libya.

Somali-Born K'naan Sees Famine's Effects Firsthand

A deadly combination of drought and conflict has caused a famine in Somalia — which is threatening the lives of more than half the country's population. Somali-Canadian rapper K'naan made a recent visit to his troubled homeland, and he talks to Renee Montagne about what he saw.

D.C. Region Braces For Hurricane Irene

As Hurricane Irene barrels up the Atlantic Coast, government officials, emergency service providers, and utility companies are bracing for the worst.

Woman Reaches K2's Summit, And A Place In History

At more than 28,000 feet, K2 is the second-highest mountain in the world. And when Gerlinde Kaltenbrunner reached its summit this week, she became the first woman to climb all 14 of the world's tallest peaks without using oxygen tanks.

New York's Long Island Urges Voluntary Evacuations

As Hurricane Irene makes it way up the East Coast, it is expected to be felt on New York's Long Island. The area is home to three million people, and there aren't many bridges to get them to the mainland. The Nassau County executive says he'll make a decision about mandatory evacuations soon.

Patent Wars Could Dull Tech's Cutting Edge

Some call it an international patent arms race: Technology companies like Apple, Samsung, Nokia and Google are launching lawsuits over competing patent claims related to smartphones and tablets. The lawsuits could bring higher prices, and less innovation.

After 15 Months In Office Japan's Leader Steps Down

Japan's Prime Minister Naoto Kan announced his resignation on Friday. He held the top leadership position for 15 months. His popularity dropped after the government was criticized for its handling of the earthquake, tsunami and nuclear disaster. Kenneth Cukier, the Tokyo correspondent for The Economist, talks to David Greene bout the political situation in Japan.

Female Golfing Phenom Seeks Titles, Recognition

World No. 1 Yani Tseng of Taiwan has been powering and smiling her way around golf courses — and making history. She has already done something that no one who has swung a golf club has done before: At the relatively tender age of 22, Tseng has won five major championships.

Libyan Rebels Plan Attack On Gadhafi's Hometown

In eastern Libya Friday, rebel fighters are expected to launch an attack aimed at Moammar Gadhafi's hometown of Sirte. It's a key pro-Gadhafi stronghold blocking the way between the rebels in Benghazi and the capital of Tripoli.

Big-Box Stores' Hurricane Prep Starts Early

Retailers such as Walmart and Home Depot have turned hurricane preparation into a science — one that government emergency agencies have begun to embrace. They've deployed hundreds of trucks carrying everything from plywood to Pop-Tarts to stores in the storm's path.

Texas Drought Takes Its Toll On Wildlife

The unfolding calamity that is the Texas drought has thrown nature out of balance. Many of the wild things that live in this state are suffering.

As Economy Teeters, All Eyes On Bernanke

The Federal Reserve chairman delivers a much-anticipated speech Friday morning on additional steps the Fed might take to shore up the economy. Some investors are hoping for another round of quantitative easing, but others warn that a solution can ultimately only be worked out by the president and congressional Republicans.

Somali Children Most Affected By Africa's Drought

More than 12 million people face starvation unless they are able to reach emergency food supplies in the horn of Africa. Somalia is particularly hard hit with a famine already declared in vast swaths of the food-growing south, which is also destabilized by a decades long civil war.