Damn Yankees! Bronx Bombers Smash A Record Three Grand Slams | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Damn Yankees! Bronx Bombers Smash A Record Three Grand Slams

Cano, Granderson and Martin aren't a "murderers' row" just yet,

But they did something last night that hadn't been done before, not even by the 1927 Yankees and that team's famed murderers' row of Ruth, Gehrig, Lazzeri and others.

In a 22-9 shellacking of the Oakland A's, the Yankees' Robinson Cano, Curtis Granderson and Russell Martin each hit grand slam home runs. It's the first time any Major League team hit more than two in one game.

ESPN New York adds that:

"In the history of the franchise, the Yankees [had] only hit two grand slams in one game on four previous occasions. The last time it happened was in September of 1999 when Bernie Williams and Paul O'Neill did it in Toronto."

Now, a lot of things have to happen to set up grand slams. Obviously, the bases have to get loaded. The right batter has to come up. And the pitcher has to groove one. But all this makes us wonder:

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