Washington Monument Damage More Extensive Than Originally Thought | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Washington Monument Damage More Extensive Than Originally Thought

Play associated audio
Surveyors found debris covering a stairwell inside the Washington Monument after a post-earthquake inspection.
National Park Service
Surveyors found debris covering a stairwell inside the Washington Monument after a post-earthquake inspection.

The Washington Monument remains closed today after further inspections gave a better picture of the damage caused by Tuesday's earthquake.

The National Park Service is now saying that the crack they found near the top of the Washington Monument after the quake is 4 feet long. The damage following Tuesday's east coast earthquake has shut down the structure indefinitely.

During a daylong search Wednesday, structural engineers found displaced limestone blocks and a debris covered stairwell near the top of the monument.

The monument appears to have four significant cracks according to NPS.

The closing comes at a time when the Park Service is expecting hundreds of thousands of visitors to the National Mall for Sunday's Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial dedication ceremony.

As of right now, the Washington Monument is the only attraction expected to be closed during Sunday's event.

WAMU 88.5

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, April 27, 2015

An Irish documentary film tells the stories of two people on different sides of the Holocaust. A classic musical is on stage at a local theater.
NPR

Drop-In Home Chefs May Be An Alternative To Assisted Living

As people age, cooking can become difficult or even physically impossible. It's one reason people move to assisted living. One company offers a chef to cook healthy, affordable meals at home.
NPR

Same-Sex Marriage, In The Justices' Words

On Tuesday, the Supreme Court will hear arguments on the question of same-sex marriage. In the meantime, though, we do know a good deal about the views of the justices already.
NPR

Canadians Love Poop, Americans Love Pizza: How Emojis Fare Worldwide

A study analyzes more than a billion pieces of emoji data across 16 languages and regions to gauge how different nations communicate. Most emojis sent are happy faces and other positive symbols.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.